A World to Win: A Century of Revolution on Screen

A World to Win: A Century of Revolution on Screen

About A World to Win

A World to Win A Century of Revolution on Screen takes its title from Marx and Engels’ famous declaration that the proletariat have a world to win. It aims to explore the legacy of early Soviet agit films across 100 years on screen.  Beginning with Sergei Eisenstein’s iconic Battleship Potemkin, and between Eisenstein’s commemoration of the revolution itself in October (1928) eight landmark films explore what revolution might mean in different times and places in the 20th century. Screening films by Sergei Eisenstein, Mikhail Kalatozov, Andrei Smirnov and Larisa Shepitko, Jean Luc Godard, Andrzej Wajda, Costa Gavras, Ken Loach and Bernardo Bertolucci the film examines the impulse to profound change as it communicates itself in film in different countries and different contexts.    

The season finishes with the British premiere of Eisenstein’s masterpiece, October, on the first day after the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution, 26th October 2017, in collaboration with the London Symphony Orchestra at the Barbican Centre, London. 

About

Bringing together provocative films by directors such as Sergei Eisenstein, Mikhail Kalatozov, Larisa Shepitko and Andrei Smirnov, Jean-Luc Godard, Gauber Rocha, Andrzej Wajda, Bernardo Bertolucci and Ken Loach, the season offers a touring programme to reach audiences across the UK and includes the once-banned Soviet film commissioned to commemorate the 50th anniversary of 1917, Larisa Shepitko and Andrei Smirnov’s Beginning of an Unknown Century on March 8, International Womens Day.

Join us for A World To Win at Regent Street Cinema and other venues across the UK from Friday 17 February 2017 culminating in a landmark screening of Sergei Eisenstein’s October with the London Symphony Orchestra at the Barbican Centre on the 26th October 2017. 

A World to Win programme is curated by Professor Ian Christie, Dr Maria Korolkova, and Justine Waddell of Kino Klassika Foundation. 

Pin It on Pinterest